1. Articles from cnbc.com

  2. 1-24 of 136 1 2 3 4 5 6 »
    1. September jobs report again shows unemployment benefits' muted role

      September jobs report again shows unemployment benefits' muted role

      The U.S. added 194,000 new payrolls and the labor force shrank by 183,000, according to the September jobs report issued Friday by the Bureau of Labor Statistics.
      The report is the first since federal unemployment programs ended on Labor Day.
      The data offers the latest evidence that pandemic-era benefits didn’t play a major role in disrupting the labor market, according to labor economists.

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    2. Americans are behind on retirement savings. Here's how to get on track

      Americans are behind on retirement savings. Here's how to get on track

      Most Americans aren't prepared for retirement. While most non-retired adults have some type of nest egg, only 36% think their retirement savings are on track, according to the Federal Reserve . A separate survey from the Insured Retirement Institute found that most workers don't have sufficient retirement savings and aren't putting enough aside to catch up. It's a problem that existed before the Covid-induced recession . For some, the pandemic exacerbated the issue.

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    3. Scammers have bilked consumers out of $545 million in Covid-related fraud

      Scammers have bilked consumers out of $545 million in Covid-related fraud

      Scammers have bilked Americans out of $545 million in Covid-related fraud since the beginning of 2020 in a range of schemes from online shopping to travel, according to the FTC. The agency received almost 589,000 consumer complaints associated with the pandemic from Jan. 1, 2020 to Aug. 30, 2021. Roughly 61% of the reports concerned fraud; the median loss was $380.

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      Mentions: Robert Williams
    4. Restaurants grapple with vaccine mandates in tight labor market

      Restaurants grapple with vaccine mandates in tight labor market
      • Restaurants are navigating vaccine mandates during one of the most challenging hiring environments in decades.
      • Some have opted to encourage workers to be vaccinated, while others have had to mandate the shot due to local policies.
      • Between enhanced unemployment benefits, hesitancy surrounding Covid, child-care hurdles and more, the industry is already facing a shortage of available workers and adding a vaccine mandate to the picture could cut both ways.
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      Mentions: Vaccine
    5. The Covid-19 Pandemic Prompted New Worries About Social Security. Here's How the Outlook Has Shifted With the Recovery

      The Covid-19 Pandemic Prompted New Worries About Social Security. Here's How the Outlook Has Shifted With the Recovery

      When the onset of the Covid-19 pandemic sent shock waves through the U.S. economy, its also prompted worries about how the ensuing downturn could affect Social Security. The program's trust funds were already running low. At the same time, the Social Security Administration was faced with the unprecedented task of moving its in-person services to mostly mail only.

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    6. Unemployment benefits. Stimulus checks. Pandemic-era aid is ending

      Unemployment benefits. Stimulus checks. Pandemic-era aid is ending

      Although everyone wants to leave the pandemic behind, the loss of the financial relief many families received because of the crisis will be less easy to part with. Stimulus checks, more generous jobless benefits, expanded money to feed children and other aid and protections kept the worst at bay in many households, and made life more tolerable during a particularly dark period. The fact that so many Americans lived paycheck-to-paycheck before the pandemic made the relief all the more necessary.

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    7. You can generate tax-free income in retirement. Here are some options

      You can generate tax-free income in retirement. Here are some options

      When it comes to planning for retirement, it's important to consider how taxes could gnaw away at your nest egg once you reach your golden years. Assuming you've left work earnings behind you, any amount owed to the IRS will come out of your retirement savings or income. So the more strategies you can put in place to minimize or eliminate your tax bill, the more money you'll keep. Of course, getting there involves doing some work in advance.

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    8. Here are 3 Medicare surprises that can cost you thousands every year

      Here are 3 Medicare surprises that can cost you thousands every year
      • When it comes to Part B (outpatient care) and Part D (prescription drug coverage) you may encounter some surprise premium costs.
      • Roughly 7% (4.3 million) of Medicare enrollees pay more than the standard premiums for Parts B and D due to so-called income-related monthly adjustment amounts, or IRMAAs.
      • Late-enrollment penalties may also apply in some situations for Parts B and/or D.
      Read Full Article
    9. What to watch today: Stocks relatively flat after another S&P 500 record high

      What to watch today: Stocks relatively flat after another S&P 500 record high

      U.S. stock futures were mixed Friday, a day after modest gains pushed the S&P 500 to another closing record and the Dow Jones Industrial Average within 24 points from Monday’s record close. The Nasdaq was the real winner Thursday, logging a 1% gain on strength in tech names. The Nasdaq was less than 2% from its February record close. (CNBC)

      Read Full Article
    10. Bernie Sanders aims to lower Medicare eligibility age in recovery bill

      Bernie Sanders aims to lower Medicare eligibility age in recovery bill

      U.S. Senator Bernie Sanders  hopes to include a Medicare expansion in Democrats' upcoming economic recovery plan. The Vermont independent and Senate Budget Committee chair hopes to lower the eligibility age for coverage to either 60 or 55 from the current 65, a Sanders aide confirmed Friday . Sanders also wants to ensure Medicare covers dental visits and glasses, among other medical needs.

      Read Full Article
    11. What to know about unemployment benefits in the new relief package

      What to know about unemployment benefits in the new relief package

      President Joe Biden signed into law the American Rescue Plan Act on Thursday, which includes a new round of stimulus checks, expands the child tax credit and puts funds into vaccine distribution. The $1.9 trillion rescue package also continues federally enhanced unemployment at $300 per week until Labor Day and adds a new tax waiver for some families.

      Read Full Article
      Mentions: Joe Biden Vaccine
    12. Stimulus check scams: here are red flags to watch for

      Stimulus check scams: here are red flags to watch for

      Americans lost over $211 million to Covid-19 scams and stimulus payment fraud, according to the Federal Trade Commission. Since January, the agency has received over 275,600 complaints. 

      While fraud activity is down from the highs recorded earlier in the year, it will likely pick back up now that President Donald Trump has signed the $900 billion pandemic relief package, the Coronavirus Response and Relief Supplemental Appropriations Act of 2021. 

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    13. Bipartisan Covid measure adds PPP for small businesses and tax breaks

      Bipartisan Covid measure adds PPP for small businesses and tax breaks

      Small business owners with battered finances might be in line for additional funding from the Paycheck Protection Program.

      On Wednesday, lawmakers from both sides of the aisle circulated a summary of their $908 billion emergency Covid relief package.

      The proposal sets aside $300 billion for the Small Business Administration, the federal agency responsible for overseeing the Paycheck Protection Program – a forgivable loan that was created through the CARES Act.

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    14. What comes next for the Dow and S&P, according to market history

      What comes next for the Dow and S&P, according to market history

      The Dow Jones Industrial Average and S&P 500 Index surged between Election Day and Monday, when Pfizer announced its Covid-19 vaccine trial data.
      The last two days saw a pullback in stocks as coronavirus cases hit new records and public health experts say the worst of the pandemic will be in the months ahead.
      Market history says that after huge short-term gains like the U.S. market just experienced, expect volatility, but the record also shows that longer-term, investors can benefit.

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    15. Improvement in coronavirus mortgage bailout stalls

      Improvement in coronavirus mortgage bailout stalls

      As of Aug. 25, 3.9 million homeowners were in mortgage forbearance programs, according to Black Knight, a mortgage technology and analytics firm. This represents 7.4% of all active mortgages and is unchanged from the week before. The numbers have not improved in the past two weeks.

      More concerning is that close to three-quarters of those in forbearance have had their terms extended from the initial three-month period. This suggests that their financial situations are not improving, and they are still unable to make their monthly payments. Another survey from the Mortgage Bankers Association also showed the rate of improvement slowing markedly.

      Read Full Article
      Mentions: coronavirus
    16. Mortgage rates just hit another record low

      Mortgage rates just hit another record low

      If there is an upside to all the pandemic-induced uncertainty in the economy, it’s the rock-bottom mortgage rate bonus for homeowners and homebuyers.
      The average rate on the popular 30-year fixed just fell to another record low — 2.87%, according to Mortgage News Daily.
      That is about a full percentage point lower than a year ago. And that’s just the average. Some borrowers are getting even lower rates.

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    17. Coronavirus: California identifies nail salons as source of spread, Gov. Newsom says

      Coronavirus: California identifies nail salons as source of spread, Gov. Newsom says

      Community spread of the coronavirus in California began in a nail salon, Gov. Gavin Newsom said Thursday, as other states allow their manicurists to reopen.
      “This whole thing started in the state of California, the first community spread, in a nail salon,” Newsom said at a news briefing. “I’m very worried about that.”
      State health directors have put some “red flags” on nail salons as a high-risk business, Newsom added, likening them to gyms and hair salons.

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    1-24 of 136 1 2 3 4 5 6 »
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